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Bullying victimisation in adolescence: prevalence and inequalities by gender, socioeconomic status and academic performance across 71 countries

Hosozawa, M; Bann, D; Fink, E; Elsden, E; Baba, S; Iso, H; Patalay, P; (2021) Bullying victimisation in adolescence: prevalence and inequalities by gender, socioeconomic status and academic performance across 71 countries. EClinicalMedicine , 41 , Article 101142. 10.1016/j.eclinm.2021.101142. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Bullying victimisation is of global importance due to its long-term negative consequences. We examined the prevalence of victimisation and its inequalities in 15-year-olds across 71 countries. Methods: Data were from the Programme for International Student Assessment (March-August 2018). Students reported frequencies of relational, physical, and verbal victimisation during the last 12 months, which were analysed separately and combined into a total score. Prevalence of frequent victimisation (> a few times a month) was estimated, followed by mean differences in total score by gender, wealth and academic performance quintiles in each country. Meta-analyses were used to examine country differences. Findings: Of 421,437 students included, 113,602 (30·4%) experienced frequent victimisation, yet this varied by country-from 9·3% (Korea) to 64·8% (Philippines). Verbal and relational victimisation were more frequent (21·4%, 20.9%, respectively) than physical victimisation (15·2%). On average, boys (vs girls +0·23SD, 95%CI: 0·22-0·24), students from the lowest wealth (vs highest +0·09SD, 0·08-0·10) and with lowest academic performance (vs highest +0·49SD, 0·48-0·50) had higher scores. However, there was substantial between-country heterogeneity in these associations (I2=85%-98%). Similar results were observed for subtypes of victimisation-except relational victimisation, where gender inequalities were smaller. Interpretation: Globally, bullying victimisation was high, although the size, predominant subtype and strength of associations with risk factors varied by country. The large cross-country differences observed require further replication and empirical explanation, and suggest the need to and the large scope for reducing bullying victimisation and its inequity in the future. Funding: Japan Foundation for Pediatric Research.

Type: Article
Title: Bullying victimisation in adolescence: prevalence and inequalities by gender, socioeconomic status and academic performance across 71 countries
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.eclinm.2021.101142
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eclinm.2021.101142
Language: English
Additional information: © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10137665
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