UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

How Representative are Neuroimaging Samples? Large-Scale Evidence for Trait Anxiety Differences Between fMRI and Behaviour-Only Research Participants.

Charpentier, CJ; Faulkner, P; Pool, ER; Ly, V; Tollenaar, MS; Kluen, LM; Fransen, A; ... O'Doherty, JP; + view all (2021) How Representative are Neuroimaging Samples? Large-Scale Evidence for Trait Anxiety Differences Between fMRI and Behaviour-Only Research Participants. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 10.1093/scan/nsab057. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of nsab057.pdf]
Preview
Text
nsab057.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (5MB) | Preview

Abstract

Over the past three decades, functional MRI (fMRI) has become key to study how cognitive processes are implemented in the human brain. However, the question of whether participants recruited into fMRI studies differ from participants recruited into other study contexts has received little to no attention. This is particularly pertinent when effects fail to generalize across study contexts: for example, a behavioural effect discovered in a non-imaging context not replicating in a neuroimaging environment. Here, we tested the hypothesis, motivated by preliminary findings (n = 272), that fMRI participants differ from behaviour-only participants on one fundamental individual difference variable: trait anxiety. Analysing trait anxiety scores and possible confounding variables from healthy volunteers across multiple institutions (n = 3317), we found robust support for lower trait anxiety in fMRI study participants, consistent with a sampling or self-selection bias. The bias was larger in studies that relied on phone screening (compared to full in-person psychiatric screening), recruited at least partly from convenience samples (compared to community samples), and in pharmacology studies. Our findings highlight the need for surveying trait anxiety at recruitment and for appropriate screening procedures or sampling strategies to mitigate this bias.

Type: Article
Title: How Representative are Neuroimaging Samples? Large-Scale Evidence for Trait Anxiety Differences Between fMRI and Behaviour-Only Research Participants.
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsab057
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsab057
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: behaviour, neuroimaging, sampling bias, trait anxiety
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10127679
Downloads since deposit
108Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item