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Outcomes of COVID-19-positive acute coronary syndrome patients: A multisource electronic healthcare records study from England

Rashid, M; Wu, J; Timmis, A; Curzen, N; Clarke, S; Zaman, A; Nolan, J; ... Mamas, MA; + view all (2021) Outcomes of COVID-19-positive acute coronary syndrome patients: A multisource electronic healthcare records study from England. Journal of Internal Medicine 10.1111/joim.13246. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patients with underlying cardiovascular disease and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) infection are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to characterize the presenting profile and outcomes of patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and COVID‐19 infection. METHODS: This observational cohort study was conducted using multisource data from all acute NHS hospitals in England. All consecutive patients hospitalized with diagnosis of ACS with or without COVID‐19 infection between 1 March and 31 May 2020 were included. The primary outcome was in‐hospital and 30‐day mortality. RESULTS: A total of 12 958 patients were hospitalized with ACS during the study period, of which 517 (4.0%) were COVID‐19‐positive and were more likely to present with non‐ST‐elevation acute myocardial infarction. The COVID‐19 ACS group were generally older, Black Asian and Minority ethnicity, more comorbid and had unfavourable presenting clinical characteristics such as elevated cardiac troponin, pulmonary oedema, cardiogenic shock and poor left ventricular systolic function compared with the non‐COVID‐19 ACS group. They were less likely to receive an invasive coronary angiography (67.7% vs 81.0%), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (30.2% vs 53.9%) and dual antiplatelet medication (76.3% vs 88.0%). After adjusting for all the baseline differences, patients with COVID‐19 ACS had higher in‐hospital (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 3.27; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.41–4.42) and 30‐day mortality (aOR: 6.53; 95% CI: 5.1–8.36) compared to patients with the non‐COVID‐19 ACS. CONCLUSION: COVID‐19 infection was present in 4% of patients hospitalized with an ACS in England and is associated with lower rates of guideline‐recommended treatment and significant mortality hazard.

Type: Article
Title: Outcomes of COVID-19-positive acute coronary syndrome patients: A multisource electronic healthcare records study from England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/joim.13246
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/joim.13246
Language: English
Additional information: © 2021 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Keywords: Acute coronary syndrome, coronavirus disease 2019, England, mortality, pandemic
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Clinical Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10126372
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