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A Randomized Trial of Albumin Infusions in Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis

China, L; Freemantle, N; Forrest, E; Kallis, Y; Ryder, SD; Wright, G; Portal, AJ; ... O'Brien, A; + view all (2021) A Randomized Trial of Albumin Infusions in Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis. The New England Journal of Medicine , 384 (9) pp. 808-817. 10.1056/NEJMoa2022166. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND Infection and increased systemic inflammation cause organ dysfunction and death in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Preclinical studies provide support for an antiinflammatory role of albumin, but confirmatory large-scale clinical trials are lacking. Whether targeting a serum albumin level of 30 g per liter or greater in these patients with repeated daily infusions of 20% human albumin solution, as compared with standard care, would reduce the incidences of infection, kidney dysfunction, and death is unknown. METHODS We conducted a randomized, multicenter, open-label, parallel-group trial involving hospitalized patients with decompensated cirrhosis who had a serum albumin level of less than 30 g per liter at enrollment. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either targeted 20% human albumin solution for up to 14 days or until discharge, whichever came first, or standard care. Treatment commenced within 3 days after admission. The composite primary end point was new infection, kidney dysfunction, or death between days 3 and 15 after the initiation of treatment. RESULTS A total of 777 patients underwent randomization, and alcohol was reported to be a cause of cirrhosis in most of these patients. A median total infusion of albumin of 200 g (interquartile range, 140 to 280) per patient was administered to the targeted albumin group (increasing the albumin level to ≥30 g per liter), as compared with a median of 20 g (interquartile range, 0 to 120) per patient administered to the standard-care group (adjusted mean difference, 143 g; 95% confidence interval [CI], 127 to 158.2). The percentage of patients with a primary end-point event did not differ significantly between the targeted albumin group (113 of 380 patients [29.7%]) and the standard-care group (120 of 397 patients [30.2%]) (adjusted odds ratio, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.71 to 1.33; P=0.87). A time-to-event analysis in which data were censored at the time of discharge or at day 15 also showed no significant between-group difference (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.35). More severe or life-threatening serious adverse events occurred in the albumin group than in the standard-care group. CONCLUSIONS In patients hospitalized with decompensated cirrhosis, albumin infusions to increase the albumin level to a target of 30 g per liter or more was not more beneficial than the current standard care in the United Kingdom. (Funded by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund; ATTIRE EudraCT number, 2014-002300-24. opens in new tab; ISRCT number, N14174793. opens in new tab.)

Type: Article
Title: A Randomized Trial of Albumin Infusions in Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa2022166
Publisher version: http://dx.doi/org/10.1056/NEJMoa2022166
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Experimental and Translational Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > UCL Medical School
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology > Comprehensive CTU at UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10124971
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