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Mechanical restitution in isolated human myocardium: A study of underlying mechanisms and myocardial hypertrophy

Cooper, Ian Charles; (1991) Mechanical restitution in isolated human myocardium: A study of underlying mechanisms and myocardial hypertrophy. Doctoral thesis (M.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

The phenomenon of mechanical restitution is investigated in isolated strips of human, guinea-pig and ferret ventricular myocardium. Species differences, together with the effects of interventions known to influence the cellular handling of calcium, provide some insight into the mechanisms underlying mechanical restitution. Mechanical restitution in human myocardium is described by three exponential processes; two recovery and one decay. The data presented support the hypothesis that the faster of the two recovery phases represents a combination of recovery of releasable calcium by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and reactivation of the slow inward current. Decay would seem to be a function of trans-sarcolemmal ionic gradients. Hypertrophic human myocardium exhibits a slowed recovery phase of restitution. The data is compatible with the hypothesis that the sarcoplasmic reticulum of hypertrophic human myocardium has a reduced rate of uptake and an increased capacity for calcium. The time course of mechanical restitution provides a possible explanation for a cellular mechanism of pulsus alternans.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: M.D
Title: Mechanical restitution in isolated human myocardium: A study of underlying mechanisms and myocardial hypertrophy
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
Keywords: Biological sciences; Health and environmental sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10124848
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