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Beliefs about medicines and self-reported medication adherence in Chinese patients with chronic diseases

Nie, B; (2021) Beliefs about medicines and self-reported medication adherence in Chinese patients with chronic diseases. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London).

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Abstract

Background For many chronic conditions, medication adherence is considered to be a crucial behaviour to achieve optimal outcomes. This thesis investigated beliefs about medicines and their associations with medication adherence in the Chinese patients. Methods Mixed methods were applied: 1) a meta-analysis summarised the correlations between specific beliefs about medicines and medication adherence in Chinese population; 2) semi-structured interviews explored Chinese patients’ cognitive representations about medicines (CRM) and links with medication-taking; 3) a ‘think-aloud’ task checked participants’ comprehension of a Chinese translation of the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ); 4) an online survey assessed CRMs and medication adherence among Chinese patients and investigated determinants of low adherence using the logistic regression models; 5) ‘structural validity’ of an expanded version of the BMQ (e-BMQ) was explored using factor analysis. Results The main findings of this PhD work were: 1) Necessity beliefs (r=0.21, 95%CI: 0.07, 0.34) and concerns about medicines (r=-0.40, 95%CI: -0.48, -0.32) showed significant correlations with adherence in the Chinese population. 2) Five BMQ components (Necessity, Concern, Harm, Benefit, Overuse), perceived sensitivity to medicines (PSM), trust in medicines and beliefs about traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) were identified as themes to describe Chinese people’s CRMs that influenced medication taking. 3) The adjusted odds ratios of low adherence were significantly associated with Necessity (0.60, 95%CI: 0.46, 0.79), Harm (1.36, 95%CI: 1.02, 1.81) and PSM (1.27, 95%CI: 1.03, 1.55) among 742 Chinese patients with CHD, hypertension and T2DM. 4) Two additional factors of the e-BMQ, Trust in medicines (0.65, 95%CI: 0.42, 0.99) and beliefs about TCM (2.15, 95%CI: 1.02, 4.53), showed significant correlations with low adherence in diabetic patients and TCM users, respectively. Conclusion The expanded BMQ appears to be a validated measurement to assess beliefs about medicines in the Chinese population that gives insight into why low adherence occurred.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Beliefs about medicines and self-reported medication adherence in Chinese patients with chronic diseases
Event: UCL (University College London)
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2021. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10120711
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