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The impact of trisomy 21 on epidemiology, management, and outcomes of congenital duodenal obstruction: a population-based study

Bethell, GS; Long, A-M; Knight, M; Hall, NJ; BAPS-CASS, ; (2020) The impact of trisomy 21 on epidemiology, management, and outcomes of congenital duodenal obstruction: a population-based study. Pediatric Surgery International , 36 pp. 477-483. 10.1007/s00383-020-04628-w. Green open access

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Abstract

Purpose: Congenital duodenal obstruction (CDO) is associated with trisomy 21 (T21), or Down’s syndrome, in around a third of infants. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of T21 on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of infants with CDO. Methods: Data were prospectively collected from specialist neonatal surgical centres in the United Kingdom over a 12 month period from March 2016 using established population-based methodology for all babies with CDO. Infants with T21 were compared to those without any chromosomal anomaly. Results: Of 102 infants with CDO that underwent operative repair, T21 was present in 33 [32% (95% CI 23–41%)] babies. Cardiac anomalies were more common in those with T21 compared to those without a chromosomal anomaly (91 vs 17%, p<0.001), whereas associated gastrointestinal anomalies were less common in infants with T21 (3 vs 12%, p=0.03). Surgical management was not infuenced by T21. Time to achieve full enteral feed, need for repeat related surgery, and mortality were similar between groups. Infants with T21 had a longer median initial inpatient stay (23 vs 16.5 days, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Infants with T21 have a higher incidence of cardiac anomalies and a longer initial inpatient stay; however, it does not change CDO management or outcomes. This information is important for prenatal and postnatal counselling of parents of infants with CDO and T21.

Type: Article
Title: The impact of trisomy 21 on epidemiology, management, and outcomes of congenital duodenal obstruction: a population-based study
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00383-020-04628-w
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00383-020-04628-w
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Duodenal atresia · Duodenal stenosis · Down syndrome · Trisomy 21 · Congenital cardiac disease
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health > Maternal and Fetal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10118826
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