UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Device-measured sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms during adolescence: a 6-year prospective cohort study

Kandola, A; Lewis, G; Osborn, DPJ; Stubbs, B; Hayes, JF; (2020) Device-measured sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms during adolescence: a 6-year prospective cohort study. Psychological Medicine 10.1017/S0033291720004948. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of device-measured-sedentary-behaviour-and-anxiety-symptoms-during-adolescence-a-6-year-prospective-cohort-study.pdf]
Preview
Text
device-measured-sedentary-behaviour-and-anxiety-symptoms-during-adolescence-a-6-year-prospective-cohort-study.pdf - Published Version

Download (350kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sedentary behaviour is potentially a modifiable risk factor for anxiety disorders, a major source of global disability that typically starts during adolescence. This is the first prospective study of associations between repeated, device-based measures of sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms in adolescents. METHODS: A UK cohort with 4257 adolescents aged 12 at baseline (56% female). Main exposures were sedentary behaviour and physical activity measured using accelerometers for 7-days at ages 12, 14, and 16. Primary outcome was anxiety symptom scores at age 18 from a Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised. We used adjusted negative binomial regression and iso-temporal substitution methods to analyse the data. RESULTS: We found a positive association between sedentary behaviour at ages 12, 14, and 16, with anxiety symptoms at age 18, independent of total physical activity volume. Theoretically replacing an hour of daily sedentary behaviour for light activity at ages 12, 14, and 16, was associated with lower anxiety symptoms by age 18 by 15.9% (95% CI 8.7-22.4), 12.1% (95% CI 3.4-20.1), and 14.7% (95% CI 4-24.2), respectively. Whereas, theoretically replacing an hour of sedentary behaviour with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was not associated with differences in anxiety symptoms. These results were robust to a series of sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSION: Sedentary behaviour is a possible risk factor for increasing anxiety symptoms during adolescence, independent of total physical activity volume. Instead of focusing on moderate-to-vigorous activity, replacing daily sedentary behaviour with light activity during adolescence could be a more suitable method of reducing future anxiety symptoms.

Type: Article
Title: Device-measured sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms during adolescence: a 6-year prospective cohort study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0033291720004948
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291720004948
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution and reproduction, provided the original article is properly cited.
Keywords: Sedentary behaviour, adolescence, anxiety, children, depression, physical activity, prevention, screen time
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10118196
Downloads since deposit
28Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item