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Physical health monitoring in dementia and associations with ethnicity: a descriptive study using electronic health records

Bhanu, C; Jones, ME; Walters, K; Petersen, I; Manthorpe, J; Raine, R; Mukadam, N; (2020) Physical health monitoring in dementia and associations with ethnicity: a descriptive study using electronic health records. BJGP Open 10.3399/bjgpopen20X101080. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Good physical health monitoring can increase quality of life for people with dementia, but the monitoring may vary and ethnic inequalities may exist. / Aim: To investigate UK primary care routine physical health monitoring for people with dementia by: (a) ethnic groups, and (b) comorbidity status. / Design & setting: A retrospective cohort study was undertaken using electronic primary care records in the UK. / Method: Physical health monitoring was compared in people with dementia from white, black, and Asian ethnic groups and compared those with ≥1 comorbidity versus no comorbidity, from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016. Using the Dementia : Good Care Planning framework and expert consensus, good care was defined as receiving, within 1 year: a dementia review; a blood pressure (BP) check (at least one); a GP consultation (at least one); a weight and/or body mass index (BMI) recording (at least one); and an influenza vaccination. / Results: Of 20 821 people with dementia, 68% received a dementia review, 80% at least one BP recording, 97% at least one GP contact, 48% a weight and/or BMI recording, and 81% an influenza vaccination in 1 year. Compared with white people, black people were 23% less likely and Asian people 16% less likely to have weight recorded (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.60 to 0.98/0.84, 0.71 to 1.00). People without comorbidities were less likely to have weight recorded (adjusted IRR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.69 to 0.79) and BP monitored (adjusted IRR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.68 to 0.75). / Conclusion: Ethnic group was not associated with differences in physical health monitoring, other than weight monitoring. Comorbidity status was associated with weight and BP monitoring. Physical health monitoring in dementia, in particular nutrition, requires improvement.

Type: Article
Title: Physical health monitoring in dementia and associations with ethnicity: a descriptive study using electronic health records
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3399/bjgpopen20X101080
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3399/bjgpopen20X101080
Language: English
Additional information: This article is Open Access: CC BY license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Keywords: dementia, ethnic groups, inequalities, large database research, primary health care
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry > Mental Health of Older People
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Applied Health Research
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10111040
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