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A fast full-wave solver for calculating ultrasound propagation in the body

Haqshenas, SR; Gélat, P; van 't Wout, E; Betcke, T; Saffari, N; (2020) A fast full-wave solver for calculating ultrasound propagation in the body. Ultrasonics , 110 , Article 106240. 10.1016/j.ultras.2020.106240. Green open access

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Abstract

Therapeutic ultrasound is a promising non-invasive method for inducing various beneficial biological effects in the human body. In cancer treatment applications, high-power ultrasound is focused at a target tissue volume to ablate the malignant tumour. The success of the procedure depends on the ability to accurately focus ultrasound and destroy the target tissue volume through coagulative necrosis whilst preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. Patient-specific treatment planning strategies are therefore being developed to increase the efficacy of such therapies, while reducing any damage to healthy tissue. These strategies require to use high-performance computing methods to solve ultrasound wave propagation in the body quickly and accurately. For realistic clinical scenarios, all numerical methods which employ volumetric meshes require several hours or days to solve the full-wave propagation on a computer cluster. The boundary element method (BEM) is an efficient approach for modelling the wave field because only the boundaries of the hard and soft tissue regions require discretisation. This paper presents a multiple-domain BEM formulation with a novel preconditioner for solving the Helmholtz transmission problem (HTP). This new formulation is efficient at high-frequencies and where high-contrast materials are present. Numerical experiments are performed to solve the HTP in multiple domains comprising: (i) human ribs, an idealised abdominal fat layer and liver tissue, (ii) a human kidney with a perinephric fat layer, exposed to the acoustic field generated by a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) array transducer. The time required to solve the equations associated with these problems on a single workstation is of the order of minutes. These results demonstrate the great potential of this new BEM formulation for accurately and quickly solving ultrasound wave propagation problems in large anatomical domains which is essential for developing treatment planning strategies.

Type: Article
Title: A fast full-wave solver for calculating ultrasound propagation in the body
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.ultras.2020.106240
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultras.2020.106240
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Cancer treatment planning, Helmholtz transmission problem, High intensity focused ultrasound, Multiple-domain boundary element method, OSRC preconditioner
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Dept of Mathematics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10110819
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