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Calibration of the minos detectors and extraction of neutrino oscillation parameters.

Smith, Christopher B; (2002) Calibration of the minos detectors and extraction of neutrino oscillation parameters. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

The MINOS experiment is designed to search for neutrino oscillations. A neutrino beam created at Fermilab will be sampled first by the Near Detector, on-site at Fermilab, and then by the Far Detector, 735km away in the Soudan mine, Minnesota. By comparing the relative fractions of neutrino flavours at the two locations, oscillation parameters can be measured. Relative calibration between the Near and Far Detectors is achieved using a Light Injection system and cosmic ray muons. Absolute calibration is established using a third, smaller detector: the Calibration Detector, (CalDet), scheduled to run in a series of test-beams at CERN. The CalDet will characterize the response of hadrons, electrons and muons in the MINOS detectors. Relative calibration of the CalDet using the MINOS Light Injection system and cosmic ray muons has been demonstrated to 2%. Stability measurements of the detector response were made using cosmic ray muons and light output variations of ~2% over a two week period have been observed which correlate well with local temperature changes. Simulated charged current v? and v? interactions in the Near and Far Detectors for the Low Energy NuMI beam have been used to study oscillation parameter measurement with MINOS. Using only the muon energy from quasi-elastic interactions, the parameters have been measured to 7.6% for sin220 and 9.6% for [delta]m2 after a two year exposure with MINOS.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Calibration of the minos detectors and extraction of neutrino oscillation parameters.
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10108251
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