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Do working memory capacity and test anxiety modulate the beneficial effects of testing on new learning?

Yang, C; Sun, B; Potts, R; Yu, R; Luo, L; Shanks, DR; (2020) Do working memory capacity and test anxiety modulate the beneficial effects of testing on new learning? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 10.1037/xap0000278. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Although testing has repeatedly been shown to be one of the most effective strategies for consolidating retention of studied information (the backward testing effect) and facilitating mastery of new information (the forward testing effect), few studies have explored individual differences in the beneficial effects of testing. The current study recruited a large sample (1,032 participants) to explore the potential roles of working memory capacity and test anxiety in the enhancing effects of testing on new learning, and the converse influence of testing on test anxiety. The results demonstrated that administering interim tests during learning appears to be an effective technique to potentiate new learning, regardless of working memory capacity and test anxiety. At a final test on all studied materials, individuals with low working memory capacity benefited more from interim testing than those with high working memory capacity. These testing effects are minimally modulated by levels of trait/state test anxiety, and low-stake interim testing neither reduced nor increased test anxiety. Overall, the results imply that low-stake interim tests can be administered to boost new learning irrespective of learners’ level of WMC, test anxiety, and of possible reactive effects of testing on test anxiety.

Type: Article
Title: Do working memory capacity and test anxiety modulate the beneficial effects of testing on new learning?
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1037/xap0000278
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1037/xap0000278
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Experimental Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10100121
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