UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Cyber-victimisation and mental health in young people: a co-twin control study

Baldwin, JR; Ayorech, Z; Rijsdijk, FV; Schoeler, T; Pingault, J-B; (2020) Cyber-victimisation and mental health in young people: a co-twin control study. Psychological Medicine pp. 1-11. 10.1017/S0033291720001178. (In press).

[img] Text
Baldwin_Cyber-victimisation and mental health in young people_SuppM.pdf - Accepted version
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 5 November 2020.

Download (361kB)
[img] Text
Baldwin_Cyber-victimisation and mental health in young people_AAM.pdf - Accepted version
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 5 November 2020.

Download (424kB)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The rise of social media use in young people has sparked concern about the impact of cyber-victimisation on mental health. Although cyber-victimisation is associated with mental health problems, it is not known whether such associations reflect genetic and environmental confounding. METHODS: We used the co-twin control design to test the direct association between cyber-victimisation and multiple domains of mental health in young people. Participants were 7708 twins drawn from the Twins Early Development Study, a UK-based population cohort followed from birth to age 22. RESULTS: Monozygotic twins exposed to greater levels of cyber-victimisation had more symptoms of internalising, externalising and psychotic disorders than their less victimised co-twins at age 22, even after accounting for face-to-face peer victimisation and prior mental health. However, effect sizes from the most stringent monozygotic co-twin control analyses were decreased by two thirds from associations at the individual level [pooled β across all mental health problems = 0.06 (95% CI 0.03-0.10) v. 0.17 (95% CI 0.15-0.19) in individual-level analyses]. CONCLUSIONS: Cyber-victimisation has a small direct association with multiple mental health problems in young people. However, a large part of the association between cyber-victimisation and mental health is due to pre-existing genetic and environmental vulnerabilities and co-occurring face-to-face victimisation. Therefore, preventative interventions should target cyber-victimisation in conjunction with pre-existing mental health vulnerabilities and other forms of victimisation.

Type: Article
Title: Cyber-victimisation and mental health in young people: a co-twin control study
Location: England
DOI: 10.1017/S0033291720001178
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291720001178
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
Keywords: Co-twin control design, cyber-bullying, cyber-victimisation, mental health, twin study
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10097649
Downloads since deposit
2Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item