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Laparoscopic Injection of Tissue Adhesives for Inguinal Hernia Repair in a Rabbit Model: Results of an Experimental Comparative Study with the Standard Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

Escolino, M; Esposito, C; Eaton, S; Di Maro, E; Cozzolino, S; Vitagliano, G; D'Armiento, M; ... De Coppi, P; + view all (2020) Laparoscopic Injection of Tissue Adhesives for Inguinal Hernia Repair in a Rabbit Model: Results of an Experimental Comparative Study with the Standard Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair. Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques , 30 (7) pp. 847-853. 10.1089/lap.2020.0015. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: The injection of tissue adhesives has been proposed as an alternative to standard laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair but no evidence is available in the pediatric population. This study aimed to evaluate safety, efficacy, and feasibility of injection of tissue adhesives for inguinal hernia repair in a rabbit model. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six New Zealand White male rabbits underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. In each animal, the hernia defect was repaired using glue on the right side and purse-string suture on the left side. The animals were divided in 3 groups, each 1 of 12 animals, according to the glue used: Glubran 2® (cyanoacrylate), Histoacryl® (cyanoacrylate), and BioGlue® (bovine serum albumin-based). For each group, 6 animals were sacrificed at 7 days postoperatively, and 6 animals at 90 days postoperatively. Histopathological exam of testis and spermatic bundle was performed. Results: The hernia defect was successfully closed on both sides in all cases. The injection of glue was faster than suture repair (P = .001). Postoperative complications (epiploon-parietal adhesions, spermatic vessel ectasia, and hydrocele) rate was significantly higher on the right side compared to the left side at both short- and long-term follow-up (P = .001). Furthermore, a lower maturity of testicles treated by adhesive compared with suture was histologically demonstrated at both short- and long-term follow-up (P = .001). Conclusions: The present experimental study confirmed the feasibility and efficacy of inguinal hernia repair by injection of tissue adhesive. However, several critical issues emerged about the safety of this technique. The use of glue was associated with higher incidence of postoperative complications and significant decrease of testicular maturity compared with standard suture repair. Based upon these preliminary results, repair using suture remains the standard of care for inguinal hernia in children. Further experimental studies are needed to assess the safety of injection of tissue adhesives for pediatric inguinal hernia repair.

Type: Article
Title: Laparoscopic Injection of Tissue Adhesives for Inguinal Hernia Repair in a Rabbit Model: Results of an Experimental Comparative Study with the Standard Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1089/lap.2020.0015
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1089/lap.2020.0015
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Children, glue, hernia, laparoscopy, rabbit, safety
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10097085
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