UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Prenatal and Infancy Nurse Home Visiting Effects on Mothers: 18-Year Follow-up of a Randomized Trial

Olds, DL; Kitzman, H; Anson, B; Smith, JA; Knudtson, MD; Miller, T; Cole, R; ... Conti, G; + view all (2019) Prenatal and Infancy Nurse Home Visiting Effects on Mothers: 18-Year Follow-up of a Randomized Trial. Pediatrics , 144 (6) , Article e20183889. 10.1542/peds.2018-3889. Green open access

[thumbnail of Olds_Kitzman_etal_Peds_R2_Prenatal and Infancy Nurse Home Visit Effects on Mothers - 18-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Trial.pdf]
Preview
Text
Olds_Kitzman_etal_Peds_R2_Prenatal and Infancy Nurse Home Visit Effects on Mothers - 18-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Trial.pdf - Accepted version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Prenatal and infancy home-visiting by nurses is promoted as a means of improving maternal life-course, but evidence of long-term effects is limited. We hypothesized that nurse-visitation would lead to long-term reductions in public-benefit costs, maternal substance abuse and depression, and that cost-savings would be greater for mothers with initially higher psychological resources. METHODS: We conducted an 18-year follow-up of 618 out of 742 low-income, primarily African-American mothers with no previous live births enrolled in an randomized clinical trial of prenatal and infancy home visiting by nurses. We compared nurse-visited and control-group women for public-benefit costs, rates of substance abuse and depression, and examined possible mediators of intervention effects. RESULTS: Nurse-visited women, compared with controls, incurred $17 310 less in public benefit costs (P = .03), an effect more pronounced for women with higher psychological resources ($28 847, P = .01). These savings compare with program costs of $12 578. There were no program effects on substance abuseor depression. Nurse-visited women were more likely to be married from child age 2 through 18 (19.2% vs 14.8%, P = .04), and those with higher psychological resources had 4.64 fewer cumulative years rearing subsequent children after the birth of the first child (P = .03). Pregnancy planning was a significant mediator of program effects on public benefit costs. CONCLUSIONS: Through child age 18, the program reduced public-benefit costs, an effect more pronounced for mothers with higher psychological resources and mediated by subsequent pregnancy planning. There were no effects on maternal substance abuse and depression.

Type: Article
Title: Prenatal and Infancy Nurse Home Visiting Effects on Mothers: 18-Year Follow-up of a Randomized Trial
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1542/peds.2018-3889
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2018-3889
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Economics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10095206
Downloads since deposit
14Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item