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A brief CBT intervention for depersonalisation/derealisation in psychosis: study protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial

Farrelly, S; Peters, E; Azis, M; David, A; Hunter, EC; (2016) A brief CBT intervention for depersonalisation/derealisation in psychosis: study protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial. Pilot and Feasibility Studies , 2 , Article 47. 10.1186/s40814-016-0086-7. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Depersonalisation is the experience of being detached or disconnected from one's experience. Studies suggest that clinically significant levels of depersonalisation are common in individuals who have psychotic symptoms and are associated with increased impairment. However, to date, there have been no studies that have investigated an intervention designed to target clinically significant depersonalisation in such patient groups. This study aims to determine the feasibility and acceptability of a brief intervention targeting clinically significant depersonalisation in those who also have current psychotic symptoms. METHODS/DESIGN: The feasibility of delivering six sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy for depersonalisation in psychosis patients will be evaluated using a single-blinded randomised controlled trial with a treatment as usual control condition. Participants will be assessed at baseline and then randomised to either the treatment or control arm. Participants randomised to the treatment arm will be offered six sessions of individual cognitive behavioural therapy delivered over a maximum of 10 weeks. Therapy will focus on an individualised shared formulation of depersonalisation experiences and behavioural, cognitive, emotional regulation and thinking process strategies to decrease distress associated with depersonalisation. Participants will be assessed again at a 10-week (post-randomisation) follow-up assessment. The primary outcomes of interest will be those assessing the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention including rates of referral, eligibility and acceptance to participate; attendance at therapy sessions and completion of homework tasks; satisfaction with the intervention; maintenance of blinding; and therapist competence. Secondary outcomes will be data on clinical outcome measures of depersonalisation and positive symptoms of psychosis, anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress. DISCUSSION: This study will determine the feasibility of delivering six sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy for individuals with current psychotic symptoms who also experience clinically significant levels of depersonalisation. The results will provide information to inform a larger randomised trial to assess intervention efficacy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02427542.

Type: Article
Title: A brief CBT intervention for depersonalisation/derealisation in psychosis: study protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s40814-016-0086-7
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-016-0086-7
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Cognitive behaviour therapy, Depersonalisation, Derealisation, Feasibility trial, Intervention, Psychosis
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10091020
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