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Decrease in resting heart rate measured using smartphone apps to verify abstinence from smoking: an exploratory study

Herbec, A; Parker, E; Ubhi, HK; Raupach, T; West, R; (2020) Decrease in resting heart rate measured using smartphone apps to verify abstinence from smoking: an exploratory study. Nicotine & Tobacco Research , Article ntaa021. 10.1093/ntr/ntaa021. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Verifying self-reports of smoking abstinence is challenging in studies that involve remote data collection. Resting heart rate (HR) decreases during smoking abstinence. This study assessed whether a decrease in resting HR measured using freely available smartphone apps could potentially be used to verify smoking abstinence. METHODS: This study involved a repeated measures experimental design, with data collection in natural setting. Participants were 18 adult, daily smokers. They recorded resting HR in beats per minute (bpm) using freely available smartphone apps during five time points (two in the morning and three post-noon) on each of three days. The outcome measure was the mean of the post-noon HR recordings. The experimental condition for each of the three days (counterbalanced order) was: 1) smoking as usual, 2) not smoking without nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), or 3) not smoking but using NRT. Abstinence was verified using expired-air carbon monoxide (CO) concentration. RESULTS: Compared with the smoking as usual condition, mean HR was 13.4 bpm lower (95%CI=5.4-21.4,p=0.001) in the not smoking without NRT condition and 10.4 bpm lower (95%CI=3.1-17.8, p=0.004) in the not smoking with NRT condition. There was no statistically significant difference in HR between the two not smoking conditions (p=0.39). Abstinence during not smoking days without and with NRT was CO-verified in 18/18 and in 16/18 cases, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Self-recording of resting heart rate in natural setting using smartphone apps shows a reliable decrease in response to smoking abstinence and may provide a basis for remote verification in smoking cessation studies. IMPLICATIONS: Remote verification of self-reported abstinence in smoking cessation studies remains challenging. Smoking abstinence has been shown to decrease resting heart rate under laboratory conditions. This study demonstrated that self-recording using freely available smartphone apps shows reliable decreases in resting heart rate during smoking abstinence and may provide a basis for inexpensive remote verification of smoking abstinence.

Type: Article
Title: Decrease in resting heart rate measured using smartphone apps to verify abstinence from smoking: an exploratory study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ntr/ntaa021
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntaa021
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10090670
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