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The domestication syndrome in vegetatively propagated field crops

Denham, T; Barton, H; Castillo, C; Crowther, A; Dotte-Sarout, E; Florin, A; Pritchard, J; ... Fuller, DQ; + view all (2020) The domestication syndrome in vegetatively propagated field crops. Annals of Botany , 125 (4) pp. 581-597. 10.1093/aob/mcz212. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND Vegetatively propagated crops are globally significant in terms of current agricultural production, as well as for understanding the long-term history of early agriculture and plant domestication. Today, significant field crops include sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum), potato (Solanum tuberosum), manioc (Manihot esculenta), bananas and plantains (Musa cvs), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia esculenta). In comparison with sexually reproduced crops, especially cereals and legumes, the domestication syndrome in vegetatively propagated field crops is poorly defined. AIMS AND SCOPE Here, a range of phenotypic traits potentially comprising a syndrome associated with early domestication of vegetatively propagated field crops is proposed, including: mode of reproduction, yield of edible portion, ease of harvesting, defensive adaptations, timing of production and plant architecture. The archaeobotanical visibility of these syndrome traits is considered with a view to the reconstruction of the geographical and historical pathways of domestication for vegetatively propagated field crops in the past. CONCLUSIONS Although convergent phenotypic traits are identified, none of them are ubiquitous and some are divergent. In contrast to cereals and legumes, several traits seem to represent varying degrees of plastic response to growth environment and practices of cultivation, as opposed to solely morphogenetic ‘fixation’.

Type: Article
Title: The domestication syndrome in vegetatively propagated field crops
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/aob/mcz212
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcz212
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Asexual (clonal) reproduction, vegetative propagation, phenotype, early agriculture, developmental plasticity, archaeobotany
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology > Institute of Archaeology Gordon Square
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10089426
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