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Gait speed as predictor of transition into cognitive impairment: Findings from three longitudinal studies on aging

Hoogendijk, EO; Rijnhart, JJM; Skoog, J; Robitaille, A; van den Hout, A; Ferrucci, L; Huisman, M; ... Terrera, GM; + view all (2019) Gait speed as predictor of transition into cognitive impairment: Findings from three longitudinal studies on aging. Experimental Gerontology , Article 110783. 10.1016/j.exger.2019.110783. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives: Very few studies looking at slow gait speed as early marker of cognitive decline investigated the competing risk of death. The current study examines associations between slow gait speed and transitions between cognitive states and death in later life. / Methods: We performed a coordinated analysis of three longitudinal studies with 9 to 25 years of follow-up. Data were used from older adults participating in H70 (Sweden; n = 441; aged ≥70 years), InCHIANTI (Italy; n = 955; aged ≥65 years), and LASA (the Netherlands; n = 2824; aged ≥55 years). Cognitive states were distinguished using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Slow gait speed was defined as the lowest sex-specific quintile at baseline. Multistate models were performed, adjusted for age, sex and education. / Results: Most effect estimates pointed in the same direction, with slow gait speed predicting forward transitions. In two cohort studies, slow gait speed predicted transitioning from mild to severe cognitive impairment (InCHIANTI: HR = 2.08, 95%CI = 1.40–3.07; LASA: HR = 1.33, 95%CI = 1.01–1.75) and transitioning from a cognitively healthy state to death (H70: HR = 3.30, 95%CI = 1.74–6.28; LASA: HR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.30–2.21). / Conclusions: Screening for slow gait speed may be useful for identifying older adults at risk of adverse outcomes such as cognitive decline and death. However, once in the stage of more advanced cognitive impairment, slow gait speed does not seem to predict transitioning to death anymore.

Type: Article
Title: Gait speed as predictor of transition into cognitive impairment: Findings from three longitudinal studies on aging
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.exger.2019.110783
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2019.110783
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Cognition, Dementia, Walking speed, Multistate modeling
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Dept of Statistical Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10086329
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