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Parkinsonism and spastic paraplegia type 7: Expanding the spectrum of mitochondrial Parkinsonism

De la Casa-Fages, B; Fernandez-Eulate, G; Gamez, J; Barahona-Hernando, R; Moris, G; Garcia-Barcina, M; Infante, J; ... Lopez de Munain, A; + view all (2019) Parkinsonism and spastic paraplegia type 7: Expanding the spectrum of mitochondrial Parkinsonism. Movement Disorders 10.1002/mds.27812. (In press).

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Abstract

Background Pathogenic variants in the spastic paraplegia type 7 gene cause a complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia phenotype associated with classical features of mitochondrial diseases, including ataxia, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, and deletions of mitochondrial DNA. Objectives To better characterize spastic paraplegia type 7 disease with a clinical, genetic, and functional analysis of a Spanish cohort of spastic paraplegia type 7 patients. Methods Genetic analysis was performed in patients suspecting hereditary spastic paraplegia and in 1 patient with parkinsonism and Pisa syndrome, through next‐generation sequencing, whole‐exome sequencing, targeted Sanger sequencing, and multiplex ligation‐dependent probe analysis, and blood mitochondrial DNA levels determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results Thirty‐five patients were found to carry homozygous or compound heterozygous pathogenic variants in the spastic paraplegia type 7 gene. Mean age at onset was 40 years (range, 12–63); 63% of spastic paraplegia type 7 patients were male, and three‐quarters of all patients had at least one allele with the c.1529C>T (p.Ala510Val) mutation. Eighty percent of the cohort showed a complicated phenotype, combining ataxia and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (65% and 26%, respectively). Parkinsonism was observed in 21% of cases. Analysis of blood mitochondrial DNA indicated that both patients and carriers of spastic paraplegia type 7 pathogenic variants had markedly lower levels of mitochondrial DNA than control subjects (228 per haploid nuclear DNA vs. 176 vs. 573, respectively; P < 0.001). Conclusions Parkinsonism is a frequent finding in spastic paraplegia type 7 patients. Spastic paraplegia type 7 pathogenic variants impair mitochondrial DNA homeostasis irrespective of the number of mutant alleles, type of variant, and patient or carrier status. Thus, spastic paraplegia type 7 supports mitochondrial DNA maintenance, and variants in the gene may cause parkinsonism owing to mitochondrial DNA abnormalities. Moreover, mitochondrial DNA blood analysis could be a useful biomarker to detect at risk families.

Type: Article
Title: Parkinsonism and spastic paraplegia type 7: Expanding the spectrum of mitochondrial Parkinsonism
DOI: 10.1002/mds.27812
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.27812
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: hereditary spastic paraplegia; mitochondria; parkinsonism; pathogenic genetic variants; SPG7 gene
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10082490
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