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Language in Schizophrenia and Aphasia: the Relationship with Non-verbal Cognition and Thought Disorder

Little, B; Gallagher, P; Zimmerer, V; Varley, R; Spencer, H; Çokal, D; Deamer, F; ... Watson, S; + view all (2019) Language in Schizophrenia and Aphasia: the Relationship with Non-verbal Cognition and Thought Disorder. Cognitive Neuropsychology , 24 (6) pp. 389-405. 10.1080/13546805.2019.1668758. Green open access

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Abstract

Objective: To determine the relationship between language abnormalities and broader cognitive impairment and thought disorder by examining language and cognition in schizophrenia and aphasia (a primary language disorder). Methods: Cognitive and linguistic profiles were measured with a battery of standardised tests, and compared in a clinical population of n = 50 (n = 30 with schizophrenia and n = 20 with aphasia) and n = 61 non-clinical comparisons (n = 45 healthy controls and n = 16 non-affected first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia). Results: Both clinical groups showed linguistic deficits. Verbal impairment was more severe in participants with aphasia, whereas non-verbal performance was more affected in participants with schizophrenia. In schizophrenia, but not in aphasia, verbal and non-verbal performance were associated. Formal thought disorder was associated with impairment in executive function and in grammatical, but not naming, tasks. Conclusion: While patients with schizophrenia and aphasia showed language impairments, the nature and cognitive basis of these impairments may be different; language performance disassociates from broader cognitive functioning in aphasia but may be an intrinsic expression of a broader cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Thought disorder may represent a core malfunction of grammatical processing. Results suggests that communicative ability may be a valid target in cognitive remediation strategies in schizophrenia.

Type: Article
Title: Language in Schizophrenia and Aphasia: the Relationship with Non-verbal Cognition and Thought Disorder
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/13546805.2019.1668758
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/13546805.2019.1668758
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Schizophrenia, aphasia, thought disorder, language, cognition
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10082186
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