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Argon plasma modification promotes adipose derived stem cells osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation on nanocomposite polyurethane scaffolds; implications for skeletal tissue engineering

Griffin, MF; Ibrahim, A; Seifalian, AM; Butler, PEM; Kalaskar, DM; Ferretti, P; (2019) Argon plasma modification promotes adipose derived stem cells osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation on nanocomposite polyurethane scaffolds; implications for skeletal tissue engineering. Materials Science and Engineering C , 105 , Article 110085. 10.1016/j.msec.2019.110085. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Bone and cartilage craniofacial defects due to trauma or congenital deformities pose a difficult problem for reconstructive surgeons. Human adipose stem cells (ADSCs) can differentiate into bone and cartilage and together with suitable scaffolds could provide a promising system for skeletal tissue engineering. It has been suggested that nanomaterials can direct cell behavior depending on their surface nanotopographies. Thus, this study examined whether by altering a nanoscaffold surface using radiofrequency to excite gases, argon (Ar), nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) with a single step technique, we could enhance the osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of ADSCs. At 24 h, Ar modification promoted the highest increase in ADSCs adhesion as indicated by upregulation of vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression compared to O2 and N2 scaffolds. Furthermore, ADSCs on Ar-modified nanocomposite polymer POSS-PCU scaffolds upregulated expression of bone markers, alkaline phosphatase, collagen I and osteocalcin after 3 weeks. Cartilage markers, aggrecan and collagen II, were also upregulated on Ar-modified scaffolds at the mRNA and protein level. Finally, all plasma treated scaffolds supported tissue ingrowth and angiogenesis after grafting onto the chick chorioallantoic membrane. Ar promoted greater expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and laminin in ovo compared to O2 and N2 scaffolds as shown by immunohistochemistry. This study provides an important understanding into which surface chemistries best support the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs that could be harnessed for regenerative skeletal applications. Argon surface modification is a simple tool that can promote ADSC skeletal differentiation that is easily amenable to translation into clinical practice.

Type: Article
Title: Argon plasma modification promotes adipose derived stem cells osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation on nanocomposite polyurethane scaffolds; implications for skeletal tissue engineering
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.msec.2019.110085
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2019.110085
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY/4.0/).
Keywords: Adipose stem cells, Osteogenesis, Chondrogensis, Argon, Plasma surface modification
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Ortho and MSK Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10081738
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