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The impact of modification techniques on the rheological properties of dysphagia foods and liquids

De Villiers, M; Hanson, B; Moodley, L; Pillay, M; (2020) The impact of modification techniques on the rheological properties of dysphagia foods and liquids. Journal of Texture Studies , 51 (1) pp. 154-168. 10.1111/jtxs.12476. Green open access

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Abstract

Modifying food and textures of food has been done for decades within the food science and technology field. More recently, modifying texture of foods has been used to manage swallowing disabilities (dysphagia). Swallowing disabilities are often associated with dehydration and malnutrition, thus nutritional intervention has formed part of serving texture-modified diets. The question remains whether these modification techniques are viable for individuals with swallowing disabilities living in majority world countries. This study used two modification methods on a widely used Specialized Nutritious Food (SNF) to determine whether it may be modified and used in dysphagia management. The techniques had to be ergonomic and economically appropriate for individuals with swallowing disabilities living in majority world countries. The International Dysphagia Diet Standardization Initiative's (IDDSI) standards were used to determine whether the texturally modified SNF is safe for swallowing. Rheological measurements were performed to determine apparent viscosity and structure recovery of each sample. The effects of two modification techniques, aeration and particle separation, on the rheological properties of the SNF were also measured and analyzed. It was determined that both milk and water could be used with this SNF to create a dysphagia diet, but only under certain conditions. The overall results indicated that heating the samples increased the apparent viscosity and exacerbated lumping. Room temperature samples had less lumps and could be classified to the desired levels of the IDDSI (Level 2 and Level 4). Using a whisk to aerate the samples reduced lumps significantly and using a sieve to separate particles of liquid samples eliminated lumps. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: The impact of modification techniques on the rheological properties of dysphagia foods and liquids
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/jtxs.12476
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/jtxs.12476
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Dysphagia, dysphagia food, rheology, swallowing disabilities, texture modification, texture-modified diets, viscosity
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10080128
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