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Understanding the association between spontaneous quit attempts and improved smoking cessation success rates: a population survey in England with six-month follow-up

Garnett, C; Shahab, L; Raupach, T; West, R; Brown, J; (2019) Understanding the association between spontaneous quit attempts and improved smoking cessation success rates: a population survey in England with six-month follow-up. Nicotine & Tobacco Research 10.1093/ntr/ntz115. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Almost half of smoking quit attempts are ‘spontaneous’ (initiated as soon as the decision to quit has been made) and are associated with increased success rates. This study aimed to assess to what extent other factors may account for this association. METHODS: Data were used from respondents to a survey representative of the adult population in England from 2006 to 2016. We included 2,018 respondents who were current smokers at baseline and had attempted to quit between baseline and six-month follow-up. Logistic regression models assessed the association between quit success and spontaneous quit attempts while adjusting for smoking, sociodemographic and quit attempt characteristics. RESULTS: Spontaneous quit attempts were associated with greater odds of quit success (OR=1.31, 95%CI=1.07-1.60) but the association was not significant in the fully adjusted model (OR_{adj} =3.08, 95%CI=2.46-3.88) and were male (OR_{adj} =1.44, 95%CI=1.16-1.80) had greater odds of success; while a greater number of attempts in the past 6 months, stronger urges to smoke (strong vs. none), higher daily cigarette consumption, and lower social grade (E vs. AB) were associated with lower odds of success (OR_{adj} range=0.32–0.98, p<.030). Quit attempts made without cutting down first were correlated with spontaneous quit attempts (r=0.150, p<.001) and appeared to account for the diminished association between spontaneous quitting and success (OR_{adj}=1.18, 95%CI=0.96-1.46). CONCLUSIONS: The increased success rate of spontaneous quit attempts appears to be because spontaneous quit attempts are more likely to be made without cutting down first. IMPLICATIONS: The increased success rate of spontaneous quit attempts appears to be because spontaneous quit attempts are more likely to be made without cutting down first.

Type: Article
Title: Understanding the association between spontaneous quit attempts and improved smoking cessation success rates: a population survey in England with six-month follow-up
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ntr/ntz115
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntz115
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: smoking, smoking cessation, adult, follow-up, smoke, self-mutilation by cutting, smokers, cigarette smoking
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10078079
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