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Decision aids to support decision making in dementia care: A systematic review

Davies, N; Schiowitz, B; Vickerstaff, V; Rait, G; Sampson, E; (2019) Decision aids to support decision making in dementia care: A systematic review. International Psychogeriatrics , 31 (10) pp. 1403-1419. 10.1017/S1041610219000826. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives: We aimed to critically evaluate decision aids developed for practitioners and caregivers when providing care for someone with dementia or for use by people with dementia themselves. Decision aids may be videos, booklets, or web-based tools that explicitly state the decision, provide information about the decision, and summarize options along with associated benefits and harms. This helps guide the decision maker through clarifying the values they place on the benefits or harms of the options. / Design: We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature in electronic databases (CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsychINFO) in March 2018. Reference lists were searched for relevant papers and citations tracked. Data were synthesized with meta-analysis and narrative synthesis. Papers were included if they met the following criteria: 1) the focus of the paper was on the evaluation of a decision aid; 2) the decision aid was used in dementia care; and 3) the decision aid was aimed at professionals, people with dementia, or caregivers. / Results: We identified 3618 studies, and 10 studies were included, covering three topics across six decision aids: 1) support with eating/feeding options, 2) place of care, and 3) goals of care. The mode of delivery and format of the decision aids varied and included paper-based, video-based, and audio-based decision aids. The decision aids were shown to be effective, increasing knowledge and the quality of communication. The meta-analysis demonstrated that decisions are effective in reducing decisional conflict among caregivers (standardized mean difference = −0.50, 95% confidence interval [ − 0.97, − 0.02]). / Conclusion: Decision aids offer a promising approach for providing support for decision-making in dementia care. People are often faced with more than one decision, and decisions are often interrelated. The decision aids identified in this review focus on single topics. There is a need for decision aids that cover multiple topics in one aid to reflect this complexity and better support caregivers.

Type: Article
Title: Decision aids to support decision making in dementia care: A systematic review
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S1041610219000826
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1041610219000826
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Dementia, decision making, decision aid, decision support tool
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10075287
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