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International incidence of psychotic disorders, 2002–17: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Jongsma, HE; Turner, C; Kirkbride, JB; Jones, PB; (2019) International incidence of psychotic disorders, 2002–17: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The Lancet Public Health , 4 (5) e229-e244. 10.1016/S2468-2667(19)30056-8. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: The last comprehensive systematic review of the incidence of psychotic disorders was published in 2004. New epidemiological data from different settings now permit a broader understanding of global variation. We examined the variation in psychosis by demographic characteristics and study method. Methods: For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, and bibliographies, and directly contacted first authors. We sought to obtain citations of original research published between Jan 1, 2002, and Dec 31, 2017, on incidence of non-organic adult-onset psychotic disorder. We included papers that were published or in grey literature and had no language restrictions. Data were extracted from published reports, where possible, by sex, age, and ethnic group. Quality of yield was assessed. Data were assessed using univariable random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression. We registered our systematic review on PROSPERO, number CRD42018086800. Findings: From 56 721 records identified, 177 met inclusion criteria. The pooled incidence of all psychotic disorders was 26·6 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 22·0–31·7). Heterogeneity was high (I 2 ≥98·5%). Men were at higher risk of all psychotic disorders (incidence rate ratio 1·44 [1·27–1·62]) and non-affective disorders (1·60 [1·44–1·77]) than women, but not affective psychotic disorders (0·87 [0·75–1·00]). Ethnic minorities were also at excess risk of all psychotic disorders (1·75 [1·53–2·00]), including non-affective disorders (1·71 [1·40–2·09]). Meta-regression revealed that population registers reported higher rates of non-affective disorders (9·64 [2·72–31·82]), schizophrenia (2·51 [1·24–5·21]), and bipolar disorder (4·53 [2·41–8·51]) than first contact study designs. Interpretation: We found marked variation in incidence of psychotic disorders by personal characteristics and place. Some geographical variation could be partially explained by differences in case ascertainment methods.

Type: Article
Title: International incidence of psychotic disorders, 2002–17: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/S2468-2667(19)30056-8
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(19)30056-8
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10073695
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