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Associations between long-term adherence to healthy diet and recurrent depressive symptoms in Whitehall II Study

Recchia, D; Baghdadli, A; Lassale, C; Brunner, E; Verdier, J-M; Kivimäki, M; Akbaraly, T; (2019) Associations between long-term adherence to healthy diet and recurrent depressive symptoms in Whitehall II Study. European Journal of Nutrition 10.1007/s00394-019-01964-z. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

PURPOSE: We examined whether long-term adherence to three diet quality scores-the Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010), Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and  transformed-Mediterranean Diet Score (tMDS), Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010) and Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) is associated with the risk of recurrent depressive symptoms. METHODS: Analyses were conducted on a sample of 4949 men and women from the Whitehall II study. Diet scores were calculated using data collected from food frequency questionnaires repeated over 11 years of exposure (1991/1993-2002/2004). Recurrence of depressive symptoms was defined when participants reported at least two episodes of depressive symptoms (assessed by Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and use of antidepressants) over the four phases of follow-up (2002/04-2015/16). RESULTS: After adjustment for potential cofounders, higher scores on AHEI-2010, DASH and tMDS at the end of the exposure period were associated with lower risk of recurrent depressive symptoms over the 13-year follow-up. Repeat measures of dietary history showed that participants who maintained a high AHEI-2010 score over the 11-year exposure period had a 19% (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.65-1.00) lower odds of recurrent depressive symptoms compared to those who maintained a low AHEI score. Participants whose AHEI-2010 score decreased over time had a 1.34-fold increased odds (95% CI 1.02-1.75) of developing recurrent depressive symptoms compared to those maintaining a high AHEI-2010. No robust associations were observed for long-term tMDS and DASH. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that long-term adherence to healthy diet defined by Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010 confers protection against recurrent depressive symptoms.

Type: Article
Title: Associations between long-term adherence to healthy diet and recurrent depressive symptoms in Whitehall II Study
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00394-019-01964-z
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-019-01964-z
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright information © The Author(s) 2019, Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010, Depressive symptoms, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, Dietary indices, Prospective cohort study, Transformed Mediterranean Diet Score
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10072665
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