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Prospective association between late evening food consumption and risk of prediabetes and diabetes: the Whitehall II cohort study

Faerch, K; Quist, JS; Hulman, A; Witte, DR; Tabak, AG; Brunner, E; Kivimäki, M; ... Vistisen, D; + view all (2019) Prospective association between late evening food consumption and risk of prediabetes and diabetes: the Whitehall II cohort study. Diabetic Medicine , 36 (10) pp. 1256-1260. 10.1111/dme.13951. Green open access

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Abstract

AIMS: We examined whether late evening food consumption was prospectively associated with the risk of developing prediabetes or diabetes in a large observational study of individuals with normoglycaemia. METHODS: Participants were 2642 men and women with normoglycaemia (HbA_{1C}< 39 mmol/mol; < 5.7%) from the Whitehall II study. Time of last eating episode (TLEE) before the examination day was assessed at baseline. We studied the associations of TLEE with 5‐year changes in HbA_{1C} and risk of developing prediabetes or diabetes (HbA_{1C} ≥ 39 mmol/mol; ≥ 5.7%). Potential heterogeneity in the association between TLEE and prediabetes or diabetes was examined using recursive partitioning modelling for time‐to‐event outcomes. RESULTS: There was a tendency of an overall association of TLEE with change in HbA1c but with little effect size [β per 1‐h increase in TLEE = 0.2 mmol/mol, 95% CI −0.0 to 0.3 (0.01%, −0.00 to 0.03); P = 0.055] and no association with the risk of developing prediabetes/diabetes (risk ratio per 1‐h increase in TLEE = 1.03, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.13; P = 0.511). According to the recursive partitioning modelling, women with HbA_{1C} ≤ 36 mmol/mol and TLEE after 21:00 had a 1.51 times (95% CI 1.16 to 1.93) higher 5‐year risk of developing prediabetes or diabetes than those having their TLEE between 16:00 and 21:00 (35.4% vs. 23.5%; P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: There was no overall association of TLEE with the development of prediabetes or diabetes in the Whitehall II population. However, explorative analyses suggested that eating late in the evening was associated with increased risk of developing prediabetes/diabetes among women with good glycaemic control. Whether restricting late evening food consumption is effective and feasible for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes needs testing in randomized controlled trials.

Type: Article
Title: Prospective association between late evening food consumption and risk of prediabetes and diabetes: the Whitehall II cohort study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/dme.13951
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.13951
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10072191
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