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The relationship between sleep duration, cognition, and dementia: A Mendelian randomization study

Henry, A; Katsoulis, M; Masi, S; Fatemifar, G; Denaxas, S; Acosta, D; Garfield, V; (2019) The relationship between sleep duration, cognition, and dementia: A Mendelian randomization study. International Journal of Epidemiology , Article dyz071. 10.1093/ije/dyz071. Green open access

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Abstract

Background Short and long sleep duration have been linked with poorer cognitive outcomes, but it remains unclear whether these associations are causal. Methods We conducted the first Mendelian randomization (MR) study with 77 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for sleep duration using individual-participant data from the UK Biobank cohort (N = 395 803) and summary statistics from the International Genomics of Alzheimer’s Project (N cases/controls = 17 008/37 154) to investigate the potential impact of sleep duration on cognitive outcomes. Results Linear MR suggested that each additional hour/day of sleep was associated with 1% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0–2%; P = 0.008] slower reaction time and 3% more errors in visual-memory test (95% CI = 0–6%; P = 0.05). There was little evidence to support associations of increased sleep duration with decline in visual memory [odds ratio (OR) per additional hour/day of sleep = 1.10 (95% CI = 0.76–1.57); P = 0.62], decline in reaction time [OR = 1.28 (95% CI = 0.49–3.35); P = 0.61], all-cause dementia [OR = 1.19 (95% CI = 0.65–2.19); P = 0.57] or Alzheimer’s disease risk [OR = 0.89 (95% CI = 0.67–1.18); P = 0.41]. Non-linear MR suggested that both short and long sleep duration were associated with poorer visual memory (P for non-linearity = 3.44e–9) and reaction time (P for non-linearity = 6.66e–16). Conclusions Linear increase in sleep duration has a small negative effect on reaction time and visual memory, but the true association might be non-linear, with evidence of associations for both short and long sleep duration. These findings suggest that sleep duration may represent a potential causal pathway for cognition.

Type: Article
Title: The relationship between sleep duration, cognition, and dementia: A Mendelian randomization study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyz071
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyz071
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Sleep duration, Mendelian randomization, cognition, dementia
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics > Clinical Epidemiology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10070809
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