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Bodies That Count: Augmentation, Community, and Disability in a Science Fiction Game

Carr, D; (2019) Bodies That Count: Augmentation, Community, and Disability in a Science Fiction Game. Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies , 14 (4) pp. 421-436. 10.3828/jlcds.2020.28. Green open access

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Abstract

The article examines the overlaps between disability studies and digital game studies through an analysis of the science fiction digital game Deus Ex: Mankind Divided. Using an adaptation of Mitchell and Snyder’s work on disability and narrative prosthesis in literature, the power implied by erasure-by-metaphor is considered, as are issues of migration, appropriation, and the grotesque. By examining ability, disability, and tangibility in relation to the game’s rules, game-play, and narrative elements, this analysis demonstrates the relevance of disability theory to science fiction games.

Type: Article
Title: Bodies That Count: Augmentation, Community, and Disability in a Science Fiction Game
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3828/jlcds.2020.28
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3828/jlcds.2020.28
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Culture, Communication and Media
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10068576
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