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Family networks during migration and risk of non-affective psychosis: A population-based cohort study

Dykxhoorn, J; Hollander, A-C; Lewis, G; Dalman, C; Kirkbride, JB; (2019) Family networks during migration and risk of non-affective psychosis: A population-based cohort study. Schizophrenia Research 10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.044. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The determinants of increased psychosis risk among immigrants remain unclear. Given ethnic density may be protective, we investigated whether the presence of immediate family, or "family networks", at time of immigration was associated with risk of non-affective psychosis. METHODS: We followed a cohort of migrants (n = 838,717) to Sweden, born 1968-1997, from their 14th birthday, or earliest immigration thereafter, until diagnosis of non-affective psychosis (ICD-9/ICD-10), emigration, death, or 2011. Using record linkage, we measured family network as the presence of adult first-degree relatives immigrating with the cohort participant or already residing in Sweden. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to examine whether risk varied between those migrating with family, migrating to join family, or migrating alone. RESULTS: Migrating with immediate family was associated with increased psychosis risk amongst males compared to males who did not migrate with family (adjusted Hazard Ratio [aHR]: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.00-1.34). Migrating with family did not increase risk among females (aHR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.78-1.07); similar observations were observed for males who immigrated to join family (aHR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.21-1.51). In contrast, females who migrated alone were at increased risk compared to females who did not migrate alone (aHR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.11-1.54). CONCLUSION: Family networks at the time of immigration were associated with differential patterns of non-affective psychotic disorders for males and females. These results suggest sex-specific differences in the perceived role of family networks during the migration process.

Type: Article
Title: Family networks during migration and risk of non-affective psychosis: A population-based cohort study
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.044
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.044
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Epidemiology, Family network, Psychotic disorder, Social capital
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10068482
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