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Interpersonal Problems in Borderline Personality Disorder: Associations with Mentalizing, Emotion Regulation, and Impulsiveness

Euler, S; Nolte, T; Constantinou, M; Griem, J; Montague, PR; Fonagy, P; (2021) Interpersonal Problems in Borderline Personality Disorder: Associations with Mentalizing, Emotion Regulation, and Impulsiveness. Journal of Personality Disorders , 35 (2) pp. 177-193. 10.1521/pedi_2019_33_427. Green open access

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Abstract

Interpersonal problems are a core symptom of borderline personality disorder (BPD). This study investigated the relationship between emotion dysregulation, impulsiveness, and impaired mentalizing in the context of predicting interpersonal problems in BPD. A total of 210 patients with BPD completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), Reflective Functioning Questionnaire (RFQ), and Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-32). The authors conducted three path models, with either mentalizing, emotion regulation, or impulsiveness as the exogenous variable. Emotion dysregulation and attentional impulsiveness predicted interpersonal problems directly, whereas hypomentalizing predicted interpersonal problems only indirectly throughout emotion dysregulation and attentional impulsiveness. The results suggest that these domains contribute significantly to interpersonal problems in BPD. Moreover, hypomentalizing might affect on interpersonal problems via its effect on impulsiveness and emotion regulation. The authors argue that focusing on emotion regulation and mentalizing in BPD treatments might have interlinked beneficial effects on interpersonal problems.

Type: Article
Title: Interpersonal Problems in Borderline Personality Disorder: Associations with Mentalizing, Emotion Regulation, and Impulsiveness
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1521/pedi_2019_33_427
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1521/pedi_2019_33_427
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Borderline personality disorder, Interpersonal problems, Mentalizing, Reflective function, Impulsiveness, Emotion regulation
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10066820
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