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On the mechanism of the electrophysiological changes and membrane lesions induced by asbestos fiber exposure in Xenopus laevis oocytes

Bernareggi, A; Conte, G; Constanti, A; Borelli, V; Vita, F; Zabucchi, G; (2019) On the mechanism of the electrophysiological changes and membrane lesions induced by asbestos fiber exposure in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Scientific Reports , 9 , Article 2014. 10.1038/s41598-019-38591-x. Green open access

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Abstract

The so-called amphibole asbestos fibers are enriched with mineral iron ions, able to stimulate ROS production. We recently reported that crocidolite asbestos was able to interact with the cell membranes of Xenopus laevis oocytes, to alter their electrical membrane properties. Here, we found that applied iron ions (Fe3+) or H2O2 (for ROS generation) mimicked these effects, suggesting that at least one effect of iron-containing asbestos fiber exposure was mediated by ROS production. Furthermore, combined Fe3+ and H2O2 acted synergistically, producing a membrane effect stronger than that induced by these factors alone. Similar to crocidolite, these changes peaked within 30 minutes of incubation and vanished almost completely after 120 min. However, in the presence of cytochalasin D, which inhibits membrane actin repair mechanisms, crocidolite or applied Fe3+/H2O2 invariably produced oocyte cell death. While the electrophysiological modifications induced by crocidolite suggested a modification of an intrinsic chloride ion channel, the morphological appearance of the treated oocytes also indicated the formation of membrane “pores”; the effects of asbestos exposure may therefore consist of multiple (not necessarily exclusive) underlying mechanisms. In conclusion, using Xenopus oocytes allowed us for the first time, to focus on a specific membrane effect of crocidolite asbestos exposure, which deserves to be tested also on human lung cell lines. Much available evidence suggests that asbestos fibers damage cells through the production of ROS. Our present data confirm that crocidolite fibers can indeed trigger ROS-mediated damaging effects in the oocyte cell membrane, provided iron ions and H2O2 are available for ROS production.

Type: Article
Title: On the mechanism of the electrophysiological changes and membrane lesions induced by asbestos fiber exposure in Xenopus laevis oocytes
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-38591-x
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-38591-x
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Environmental impact, Experimental models of disease, Voltage clamp
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Pharmacology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10064594
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