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Determinants of attitudes and beliefs toward human papillomavirus infection, cervical cancer and human papillomavirus vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India

Degarege, A; Krupp, K; Srinivas, V; Ibrahimou, B; Marlow, LAV; Arun, A; Madhivanan, P; (2018) Determinants of attitudes and beliefs toward human papillomavirus infection, cervical cancer and human papillomavirus vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research , 44 (11) pp. 2091-2100. 10.1111/jog.13765. Green open access

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Abstract

AIM: This study examined the determinants of attitudes and beliefs about human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, cervical cancer and HPV vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India. METHODS: A random sample of 800 parents who had at least one adolescent-aged daughter attending school were recruited for a survey. RESULTS: Most parents (n = 778; 97.3%) completed the survey. Compared to Hindus, Muslims were more likely to perceive that their daughters are susceptible to HPV infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.87, 8.49) or cervical cancer (aOR: 2.73; 95% CI: 1.55, 4.80). However, the likelihood of perceiving that daughters are susceptible to HPV infection (aOR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.90, 0.98) or cervical cancer (aOR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.92, 0.99) decreased with an increase in the age of the parents. Perceived severity of HPV infection (aOR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.97) and cervical cancer (aOR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.74) was lower among Muslims than Hindus. Muslims had lower odds of believing that HPV vaccine is safe (aOR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.89) or could protect against cervical cancer (aOR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.48), but were more likely to feel that HPV vaccination may cause girls to become more sexually active (aOR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.39). The odds of believing that HPV vaccine is effective increased with an increase in the age of the parents (aOR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.003, 1.06). CONCLUSION: Among Indian parents, age and religion of parents are associated with parental attitudes and beliefs about the threat of HPV and cervical cancer as well as the risks and benefits of HPV vaccine.

Type: Article
Title: Determinants of attitudes and beliefs toward human papillomavirus infection, cervical cancer and human papillomavirus vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India
Location: Australia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/jog.13765
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/jog.13765
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: attitude, cervical cancer, human papillomavirus, vaccine
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10061516
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