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Is R2P Still Controversial? Continuity and Change in the Debate on 'Humanitarian Intervention'

Crossley, NK; (2019) Is R2P Still Controversial? Continuity and Change in the Debate on 'Humanitarian Intervention'. Cambridge Review of International Affairs 10.1080/09557571.2018.1516196. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Is the responsibility to protect (R2P) still controversial? The question is important because if R2P was no longer controversial, this would suggest that the principle is on track to consolidation as an international norm. The article assesses the impact of 16 years of sustained R2P advocacy and its influence on arguments within the scholarly community, and discusses the impact this engagement has had on the outline and substance of the principle itself. A survey of the development of the academic debate since 2005 suggests that the ‘responsibility to protect’ has successfully replaced ‘humanitarian intervention’ in international discourse, but that the principle remains controversial, especially beyond the policy community, particularly in the world of academe, in the humanitarian aid sector and religious organizations and with states with a colonial past.

Type: Article
Title: Is R2P Still Controversial? Continuity and Change in the Debate on 'Humanitarian Intervention'
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/09557571.2018.1516196
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/09557571.2018.1516196
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Political Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10058488
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