UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Prominent changes in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity during continuous cognitive processing

Castellazzi, G; Bruno, SD; Toosy, AT; Casiraghi, L; Palesi, F; Savini, G; D'Angelo, E; (2018) Prominent changes in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity during continuous cognitive processing. Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience , 12 , Article 331. 10.3389/fncel.2018.00331. Green open access

[thumbnail of Castellazzi_fncel-12-00331.pdf]
Preview
Text
Castellazzi_fncel-12-00331.pdf - Published Version

Download (4MB) | Preview

Abstract

While task-dependent responses of specific brain areas during cognitive tasks are well established, much less is known about the changes occurring in resting state networks (RSN) in relation to continuous cognitive processing. In particular, the functional involvement of cerebro cerebellar loops connecting the posterior cerebellum to associative cortices, remains unclear. In this study, 22 healthy volunteers underwent a multi-session functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol composed of four consecutive 8-min resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) scans. After a first control scan, participants listened to a narrated story for the entire duration of the second rs-fMRI scan; two further rs-fMRI scans followed the end of story listening. The story plot was purposely designed to stimulate specific cognitive processes that are known to involve the cerebro-cerebellar loops. Almost all of the identified 15 RSNs showed changes in functional connectivity (FC) during and for several minutes after the story. The FC changes mainly occurred in the frontal and prefrontal cortices and in the posterior cerebellum, especially in Crus I-II and lobule VI. The FC changes occurred in cerebellar clusters belonging to different RSNs, including the cerebellar network (CBLN), sensory networks (lateral visual network, LVN; medial visual network, MVN) and cognitive networks (default mode network, DMN; executive control network, ECN; right and left ventral attention networks, RVAN and LVAN; salience network, SN; language network, LN; and working memory network, WMN). Interestingly, a k-means analysis of FC changes revealed clustering of FCN, ECN and WMN, which are all involved in working memory functions, CBLN, DMN and SN, which play a key-role in attention switching, and RSNs involved in visual imagery. These results show that the cerebellum is deeply entrained in well-structured network clusters, which reflect multiple aspects of cognitive processing, during and beyond the conclusion of auditory stimulation.

Type: Article
Title: Prominent changes in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity during continuous cognitive processing
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fncel.2018.00331
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.3389/fncel.2018.00331
Language: English
Additional information: © 2018 Castellazzi, Bruno, Toosy, Casiraghi, Palesi, Savini, D’Angelo and Wheeler-Kingshott. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: cerebellum; resting state fMRI; functional connectivity; resting state networks;cognition.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neuroinflammation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10056507
Downloads since deposit
76Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item