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Potassium and sodium microdomains in thin astroglial processes: A computational model study

Breslin, K; Wade, JJ; Wong-Lin, KF; Harkin, J; Flanagan, B; Van Zalinge, H; Hall, S; ... McDaid, L; + view all (2018) Potassium and sodium microdomains in thin astroglial processes: A computational model study. PLoS Computational Biology , 14 (5) , Article e1006151. 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006151. Green open access

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Abstract

A biophysical model that captures molecular homeostatic control of ions at the perisynaptic cradle (PsC) is of fundamental importance for understanding the interplay between astroglial and neuronal compartments. In this paper, we develop a multi-compartmental mathematical model which proposes a novel mechanism whereby the flow of cations in thin processes is restricted due to negatively charged membrane lipids which result in the formation of deep potential wells near the dipole heads. These wells restrict the flow of cations to “hopping” between adjacent wells as they transverse the process, and this surface retention of cations will be shown to give rise to the formation of potassium (K+) and sodium (Na+) microdomains at the PsC. We further propose that a K+microdomain formed at the PsC, provides the driving force for the return of K+to the extracellular space for uptake by the neurone, thereby preventing K+undershoot. A slow decay of Na+was also observed in our simulation after a period of glutamate stimulation which is in strong agreement with experimental observations. The pathological implications of microdomain formation during neuronal excitation are also discussed.

Type: Article
Title: Potassium and sodium microdomains in thin astroglial processes: A computational model study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006151
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006151
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2018 Breslin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10051252
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