UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

How do aging and age-related hearing loss affect the ability to communicate effectively in challenging communicative conditions?

Hazan, VL; Tuomainen, O; Tu, L; Kim, J; Davis, C; Brungart, D; Sheffield, B; (2018) How do aging and age-related hearing loss affect the ability to communicate effectively in challenging communicative conditions? Hearing Research , 369 pp. 33-41. 10.1016/j.heares.2018.06.009. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Hazan_1-s2.0-S0378595517305166-main.pdf - Published version

Download (958kB) | Preview

Abstract

This study investigated the relation between the intelligibility of conversational and clear speech produced by older and younger adults and (a) the acoustic profile of their speech (b) communication effectiveness. Speech samples from 30 talkers from the elderLUCID corpus were used: 10 young adults (YA), 10 older adults with normal hearing (OANH) and 10 older adults with presbycusis (OAHL). Samples were extracted from recordings made while participants completed a problem-solving cooperative task (diapix) with a conversational partner who could either hear them easily (NORM) or via a simulated hearing loss (HLS), which led talkers to naturally adopt a clear speaking style. In speech-in-noise listening experiments involving 21 young adult listeners, speech samples by OANH and OAHL were rated and perceived as less intelligible than those of YA talkers. HLS samples were more intelligible than NORM samples, with greater improvements in intelligibility across conditions seen for OA speech. The presence of presbycusis affected (a) the clear speech strategies adopted by OAHL talkers and (b) task effectiveness: OAHL talkers showed some adaptations consistent with an increase in vocal effort, and it took them significantly longer than the YA group to complete the diapix task. The relative energy in the 1-3 kHz frequency region of the long-term average spectrum was the feature that best predicted: (a) the intelligibility of speech samples, and (b) task transaction time in the HLS condition. Overall, our study suggests that spontaneous speech produced by older adults is less intelligible in babble noise, probably due to less energy present in the 1-3 kHz frequency range rich in acoustic cues. Even mild presbycusis in ‘healthy aged’ adults can affect the dynamic adaptations in speech that are beneficial for effective communication.

Type: Article
Title: How do aging and age-related hearing loss affect the ability to communicate effectively in challenging communicative conditions?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.heares.2018.06.009
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.06.009
Language: English
Additional information: © 2018 The Authors. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Speech communication, aging, age-related hearing loss, intelligibility, spontaneous speech
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Speech, Hearing and Phonetic Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10050279
Downloads since deposit
71Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item