UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Early adolescent outcomes of joint developmental trajectories of problem behavior and IQ in childhood

Flouri, E; Papachristou, E; Midouhas, E; Joshi, H; Ploubidis, GB; Lewis, G; (2018) Early adolescent outcomes of joint developmental trajectories of problem behavior and IQ in childhood. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry , 27 (12) pp. 1595-1605. 10.1007/s00787-018-1155-7. Green open access

[thumbnail of Flouri VoR Flouri2018_Article_EarlyAdolescentOutcomesOfJoint.pdf]
Preview
Text
Flouri VoR Flouri2018_Article_EarlyAdolescentOutcomesOfJoint.pdf - Published Version

Download (1MB) | Preview
[thumbnail of Supplementary data]
Preview
Text (Supplementary data)
Flouri_Early_adolescent_outcomes_Suppl.pdf

Download (418kB) | Preview

Abstract

General cognitive ability (IQ) and problem behavior (externalizing and internalizing problems) are variable and inter-related in children. However, it is unknown how they co-develop in the general child population and how their patterns of co-development may be related to later outcomes. We carried out this study to explore this. Using data from 16,844 Millennium Cohort Study children, we fitted three-parallel-process growth mixture models to identify joint developmental trajectories of internalizing, externalizing and IQ scores at ages 3-11 years. We then examined their associations with age 11 outcomes. We identified a typically developing group (83%) and three atypical groups, all with worse behavior and ability: children with improving behavior and low (but improving in males) ability (6%); children with persistently high levels of problems and low ability (5%); and children with worsening behavior and low ability (6%). Compared to typically developing children, the latter two groups were more likely to show poor decision-making, be bullies or bully victims, engage in antisocial behaviors, skip and dislike school, be unhappy and have low self-esteem. By contrast, children (especially males) in the improver group had outcomes that were similar to, or even better than, those of their typically developing peers. These findings encourage the development of interventions to target children with both cognitive and behavioral difficulties.

Type: Article
Title: Early adolescent outcomes of joint developmental trajectories of problem behavior and IQ in childhood
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00787-018-1155-7
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00787-018-1155-7
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Cognitive ability, Externalizing problems, IQ, Internalizing problems, Joint trajectories, Problem behavior
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Psychology and Human Development
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10047122
Downloads since deposit
148Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item