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Electronic Devices for Cognitive Impairment Screening: a Systematic Literature Review

Antonio Garcia-Casal, J; Franco-Martin, M; Victoria Perea-Bartolome, M; Miguel Toribio-Guzman, J; Garcia-Moja, C; Goni-Imizcoz, M; Csipke, E; (2017) Electronic Devices for Cognitive Impairment Screening: a Systematic Literature Review. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care , 33 (6) pp. 654-673. 10.1017/S0266462317000800. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The reduction in cognitive decline depends on timely diagnosis. The aim of this systematic review was to analyze the current available information and communication technologies-based instruments for cognitive decline early screening and detection in terms of usability, validity, and reliability. METHODS: Electronic searches identified 1,785 articles of which thirty-four met the inclusion criteria and were grouped according to their main purpose into test batteries, measures of isolated tasks, behavioral measures, and diagnostic tools. RESULTS: Thirty one instruments were analyzed. Fifty-two percent were personal computer based, 26 percent tablet, 13 percent laptop, and 1 was mobile phone based. The most common input method was touchscreen (48 percent). The instruments were validated with a total of 4,307 participants: 2,146 were healthy older adults (M = 73.59; SD = 5.12), 1,104 had dementia (M = 74.65; SD = 3.98) and 1,057 mild cognitive impairment (M = 74.84; SD = 4.46). Only 6 percent were administered at home, 19 percent reported outcomes about usability, and 22 percent about understandability. The methodological quality of the studies was good, the weakest methodological area being usability. Most of the instruments obtained acceptable values of specificity and sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: It is necessary to create home delivered instruments and to include usability studies in their design. Involvement of people with cognitive decline in all phases of the development process is of great importance to obtain valuable and user-friendly products. It would be advisable for researchers to make an effort to provide cutoff points for their instruments.

Type: Article
Title: Electronic Devices for Cognitive Impairment Screening: a Systematic Literature Review
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0266462317000800
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0266462317000800
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Health Care Sciences & Services, Public, Environmental & Occupational Health, Medical Informatics, Cognitive dysfunction, Computers, Dementia, Screening, Human engineering, ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE, EVERYDAY TECHNOLOGY, VIRTUAL-REALITY, OLDER-ADULTS, USER EXPERIENCE, DEMENTIA, PEOPLE, TOOL, USABILITY, VALIDITY
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10043550
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