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Fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) rs9939609 polymorphism modifies the relationship between body mass index and affective symptoms through the life course: a prospective birth cohort study

Koike, S; Richards, M; Wong, A; Hardy, R; (2018) Fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) rs9939609 polymorphism modifies the relationship between body mass index and affective symptoms through the life course: a prospective birth cohort study. Transational Psychiatry , 8 , Article 62. 10.1038/s41398-018-0110-1. Green open access

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Abstract

Although bi-directional relationships between high body mass index (BMI) and affective symptoms have been found, no study has investigated the relationships across the life course. There has also been little exploration of whether the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) rs9939609 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is associated with affective symptoms and/or modifies the relationship between BMI and affective symptoms. In the MRC National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD), 4556 participants had at least one measure of BMI and affective symptoms between ages 11 and 60–64 years. A structural equation modelling framework was used with the BMI trajectory fitted as latent variables representing BMI at 11, and adolescent (11–20 years), early adulthood (20–36 years) and midlife (36–53 years) change in BMI. Higher levels of adolescent emotional problems were associated with greater increases in adult BMI and greater increases in early adulthood BMI were associated with higher subsequent levels of affective symptoms in women. The rs9939609 risk variant (A allele) from 2469 participants with DNA genotyping at age 53 years showed mostly protective effect modification of these relationship. Increases in adolescent and early adulthood BMI were generally not associated with, or were associated with lower levels, of affective symptoms in the FTO risk homozygote (AA) group, but positive associations were seen in the TT group. These results suggest bi-directional relationships between higher BMI and affective symptoms across the life course in women, and that the relationship could be ameliorated by rs9939609 risk variant.

Type: Article
Title: Fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) rs9939609 polymorphism modifies the relationship between body mass index and affective symptoms through the life course: a prospective birth cohort study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41398-018-0110-1
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41398-018-0110-1
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10041511
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