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Correlates of high impact physical activity measured objectively in older British adults

Elhakeem, A; Hannam, K; Deere, KC; Hartley, A; Clark, EM; Moss, C; Edwards, MH; ... Tobias, JH; + view all (2018) Correlates of high impact physical activity measured objectively in older British adults. Journal of Public Health , 40 (4) pp. 727-737. 10.1093/pubmed/fdx171. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Exposure to higher magnitude vertical impacts is thought to benefit bone health. The correlates of this high-impact physical activity (PA) in later life are unknown. / Methods: Participants were from the Cohort for Skeletal Health in Bristol and Avon, Hertfordshire Cohort Study and MRC National Survey of Health and Development. Associations of demographic, behavioural, physiological and psychological factors with vertical acceleration peaks ≥1.5 g (i.e. high-impact PA) from 7-day hip-worn accelerometer recordings were examined using linear regression. / Results: A total of 1187 participants (mean age = 72.7 years, 66.6% females) were included. Age, sex, education, active transport, self-reported higher impact PA, walking speed and self-rated health were independently associated with high-impact PA whereas BMI and sleep quality showed borderline independent associations. For example, differences in log-high-impact counts were 0.50 (P < 0.001) for men versus women and −0.56 (P < 0.001) for worst versus best self-rated health. Our final model explained 23% of between-participant variance in high impacts. Other correlates were not associated with high-impact activity after adjustment. / Conclusions: Besides age and sex, several factors were associated with higher impact PA in later life. Our findings help identify characteristics of older people that might benefit from interventions designed to promote osteogenic PA.

Type: Article
Title: Correlates of high impact physical activity measured objectively in older British adults
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdx171
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdx171
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com.
Keywords: accelerometer, ageing, epidemiology, physical activity, vertical impacts
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10038299
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