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A review of research into the development of radiologic expertise: Implications for computer-based training

Taylor, PM; (2007) A review of research into the development of radiologic expertise: Implications for computer-based training. ACAD RADIOL , 14 (10) 1252 - 1263. 10.1016/j.acra.2007.06.016. Green open access

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Abstract

Rationale and Objectives. Studies of radiologic error reveal high levels of variation between radiologists. Although it is known that experts outperform novices, we have only limited knowledge about radiologic expertise and how it is acquired.Materials and Methods. This review identifies three areas of research: studies of the impact of experience and related factors on the accuracy of decision-making; studies of the organization of expert knowledge; and studies of radiologists' perceptual processes.Results and Conclusion. Interpreting evidence from these three paradigms in the light of recent research into perceptual learning and studies of the visual pathway has a number of conclusions for the training of radiologists, particularly for the design of computer-based learning programs that are able to illustrate the similarities and differences between diagnoses, to give access to large numbers of cases and to help identify weaknesses in the way trainees build up a global representation from fixated regions.

Type:Article
Title:A review of research into the development of radiologic expertise: Implications for computer-based training
Open access status:An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI:10.1016/j.acra.2007.06.016
Keywords:radiology, education, medical, visual perception, professional competence, FRONTAL EYE FIELD, VISUAL-SEARCH, MAMMOGRAM INTERPRETATION, SCREENING MAMMOGRAPHY, PATTERN-RECOGNITION, OBSERVER VARIATION, DECISION-MAKING, LUNG-CANCER, PERFORMANCE, PERCEPTION
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care > CHIME

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