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Dendritic and mast cell involvement in the inflammatory response to primary malignant bone tumours

Inagaki, Y; Hookway, E; Williams, KA; Hassan, AB; Oppermann, U; Tanaka, Y; Soilleux, E; (2016) Dendritic and mast cell involvement in the inflammatory response to primary malignant bone tumours. Clinical Sarcoma Research , 6 , Article 13. 10.1186/s13569-016-0053-3. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: A chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate is commonly seen in response to primary malignant tumours of bone. This is known to contain tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) and lymphocytes; dendritic cells (DCs) and mast cells (MCs) have also been identified but whether these and other inflammatory cells are seen commonly in specific types of bone sarcoma is uncertain. METHODS: In this study we determined the nature of the inflammatory cell infiltrate in 56 primary bone sarcomas. Immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies was employed to assess semiquantitatively CD45+ leukocyte infiltration and the extent of the DC, MC, TAM and T and B lymphocyte infiltrate. RESULTS: The extent of the inflammatory infiltrate in individual sarcomas was very variable. A moderate or heavy leukocyte infiltrate was more commonly seen in conventional high-grade osteosarcoma, undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma and giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) than in Ewing sarcoma, chordoma and chondrosarcoma. CD14+/CD68+ TAMs and CD3+ T lymphocytes were the major components of the inflammatory cell response but (DC-SIGN/CD11c+) DCs were also commonly noted when there was a significant TAM and T lymphocyte infiltrate. MCs were identified mainly at the periphery of sarcomas, including the osteolytic tumour-bone interface. DISCUSSION: Our findings indicate that, although variable, some malignant bone tumours (e.g. osteosarcoma, GCTB) are more commonly associated with a pronounced inflammatory cell infiltrate than others (e.g. chondrosarcoma. Ewing sarcoma); the infiltrate is composed mainly of TAMs but includes a significant DC, T lymphocyte and MC infiltrate. CONCLUSION: Tumours that contain a heavy inflammatory cell response, which includes DCs, TAMs and T lymphocytes, may be more amenable to immunomodulatory therapy. MCs are present mainly at the tumour edge and are likely to contribute to osteolysis and tumour invasion.

Type: Article
Title: Dendritic and mast cell involvement in the inflammatory response to primary malignant bone tumours
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13569-016-0053-3
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13569-016-0053-3
Language: English
Additional information: © 2016 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/ publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Bone sarcomas, Dendritic cells, Immunity, Lymphocytes, Macrophages, Mast cells
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Pathology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1575164
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