UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Prize law, maritime neutrality, and the law of nations in imperial Russia, 1768-1856

Leikin, J; (2016) Prize law, maritime neutrality, and the law of nations in imperial Russia, 1768-1856. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London).

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

My thesis examines the development and use of prize law – an aspect of the law of nations which sanctioned the legal capture of ships and their cargo by warring nations – by the Russian Empire from the 1760s to the 1850s. Russia’s development of this legal concept as a method of control over the Baltic and Black Seas seems puzzling. Traditional narratives portray Russia as a land-based empire with military strength, but few of the liberal values that should accompany the notions of due process and justice implicit in the institution of a prize court. However, my dissertation argues that legal rhetoric played an important part in Russia’s interactions with other empires. And while the period in question was a crucial one for Russian legal development, culminating in an unprecedented codification project, international legal history – and prize law in particular – remain underdeveloped themes in Russian historiography.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Prize law, maritime neutrality, and the law of nations in imperial Russia, 1768-1856
Event: UCL
Language: English
Keywords: Russian Empire, international law, maritime law, history
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > SSEES
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1532115
Downloads since deposit
1Download
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item