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No harm, no foul?: Expert views on the future direction of marine antibiofouling technologies

Larsson, LM; Vandeleur, HM; Nyden, M; Styan, CA; (2016) No harm, no foul?: Expert views on the future direction of marine antibiofouling technologies. In: Chemeca 2016: Chemical Engineering - Regeneration, Recovery and Reinvention. (pp. pp. 995-1006). Engineers Australia: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Green open access

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Abstract

The colonisation of submerged surfaces by marine fouling organisms is a global problem with impacts ranging from clogged pipelines and aquaculture nets through to hull fouling that increases fuel costs and green-house gas emissions and provide potential habitats for invasive species. Marine antibiofouling techniques, such as copper plates on ships and functional coatings that release toxic biocides, were historically developed in order to reduce the frequency and expense of the physical removal of fouling organisms. For a time the solution was thought to be tributyltin self-polishing coatings, but these were later proven to be detrimental to the marine environment and subsequently banned. Today, the 'state-of-the-art' general-use coatings are based on the release of biocidal copper and booster biocides, but environmental concerns exist regarding their impacts on marine life and future legislation may put restrictions on their use. While non-biocide based alternatives include non-stick or foul-release coatings, these generally work best on fast moving vessels with little stationary time, even if recent developments seem to reduce this demand on speed. We utilised a targeted questionnaire to a range of experts that work with, or are affected by, marine anti-biofouling to assess their views about potential antifouling technologies of the future. The paper provide insights into the expectations and demands that need to be addressed in development and implementation of future marine anti-biofouling technologies and indicate how those views differ between professional roles.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: No harm, no foul?: Expert views on the future direction of marine antibiofouling technologies
Event: Chemeca 2016: Chemical Engineering - Regeneration, Recovery and Reinvention
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Dates: 25 September 2016 - 28 September 2016
ISBN: 9781922107831
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=4...
Language: English
Additional information: © Engineers Australia, 2016.
Keywords: Expert opinions, future anti-fouling technologies, marine biofouling
UCL classification: UCL > School of BEAMS
UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > UCL Australia
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1529364
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