UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

The efficacy of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) on mood may depend on individual differences including age and trait mood

Evans, C; Banissy, MJ; Charlton, RA; (2018) The efficacy of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) on mood may depend on individual differences including age and trait mood. Clinical Neurophysiology , 129 (6) pp. 1201-1208. 10.1016/j.clinph.2018.03.012. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Evans_Efficacy.pdf - ["content_typename_Published version" not defined]

Download (520kB) | Preview

Abstract

Objectives: To assess whether changes in brain microstructures associated with ageing and presence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) reduce the efficacy of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) improving mood in euthymic older adults. // Methods: Using excitatory high-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) over bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the effect on mood was assessed in euthymic young adults (YA), older adults (HOA) and older adults with CVRF (OVR). Active-tRNS or sham was applied over two sessions. Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale measured self-reported state mood before and after stimulation. Trait mood was also measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale. // Results: Response to tRNS seemed dependent on individual differences in age and trait mood. In HOA, more negative trait mood was associated with more positive mood change after tRNS. OVR showed a similar but reduced pattern of mood change to HOA. In YA, more positive trait mood was associated with greater positive mood change after tRNS. // Conclusions: Age and trait mood may be important factors when examining the efficacy of tES as an alternative treatment for depression. // Significance: Future studies should consider how response to tES is affected by individual differences.

Type: Article
Title: The efficacy of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) on mood may depend on individual differences including age and trait mood
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.clinph.2018.03.012
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2018.03.012
Language: English
Additional information: © 2018 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Keywords: Transcranial random noise stimulation, Brain stimulation Aging, Cardiovascular risk, Depression
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10055968
Downloads since deposit
69Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item