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Common Cortical Loci Are Activated during Visuospatial Interpolation and Orientation Discrimination Judgements

Tibber, MS; Anderson, EJ; Melmoth, DR; Rees, G; Morgan, MJ; (2009) Common Cortical Loci Are Activated during Visuospatial Interpolation and Orientation Discrimination Judgements. PLOS ONE , 4 (2) , Article e4585. 10.1371/journal.pone.0004585. Green open access

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Abstract

There is a wealth of literature on the role of short-range interactions between low-level orientation-tuned filters in the perception of discontinuous contours. However, little is known about how spatial information is integrated across more distant regions of the visual field in the absence of explicit local orientation cues, a process referred to here as visuospatial interpolation (VSI). To examine the neural correlates of VSI high field functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to study brain activity while observers either judged the alignment of three Gabor patches by a process of interpolation or discriminated the local orientation of the individual patches. Relative to a fixation baseline the two tasks activated a largely over-lapping network of regions within the occipito-temporal, occipito-parietal and frontal cortices. Activated clusters specific to the orientation task (orientation. interpolation) included the caudal intraparietal sulcus, an area whose role in orientation encoding per se has been hotly disputed. Surprisingly, there were few task-specific activations associated with visuospatial interpolation (VSI. orientation) suggesting that largely common cortical loci were activated by the two experimental tasks. These data are consistent with previous studies that suggest higher level grouping processes-putatively involved in VSI-are automatically engaged when the spatial properties of a stimulus (e. g. size, orientation or relative position) are used to make a judgement.

Type: Article
Title: Common Cortical Loci Are Activated during Visuospatial Interpolation and Orientation Discrimination Judgements
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0004585
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0004585
Language: English
Additional information: © 2009 Tibber et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This work was funded by the Wellcome Trust (grant no. 079766). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
Keywords: LATERAL OCCIPITAL COMPLEX, HUMAN EXTRASTRIATE CORTEX, HUMAN VISUAL-SYSTEM, OBJECT IDENTIFICATION, HUMAN BRAIN, SURFACE-ORIENTATION, PARIETAL CORTEX, NEGATIVE BOLD, ANATOMICAL LANDMARK, RECEPTIVE-FIELDS
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/96590
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