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Prospective study of coffee and tea consumption in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus among men and women: The Whitehall II study

Hamer, M; Witte, DR; Mosdol, A; Marmot, MG; Brunner, EJ; (2008) Prospective study of coffee and tea consumption in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus among men and women: The Whitehall II study. BRIT J NUTR , 100 (5) 1046 - 1053. 10.1017/S0007114508944135. Green open access

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Abstract

At least fourteen cohort studies have documented all inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes. We examined the prospective association between coffee and tea consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus among British men (n 4055) and women (n 1768) from the Whitehall II cohort. During 11.7 years follow-up there were a total of 387 incident cases of diabetes confirmed by Self-report of doctor's diagnosis or glucose tolerance tests. Despite an inverse association between coffee intake and 2 h post-load glucose concentration at the baseline assessment, combined caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee (hazard ratio (HR) 0-80 95% CI 0.54, 1.18) or only decaffeinated coffee intake (HR 0.65: 95% CI 0.36, 1.16) was not significantly associated with diabetes risk at follow-up after adjustment for possible confounders. There was all association between tea intake and diabetes (HR 0.66: 95% CI 0.61, 1.22: P<0.05) after adjustment for age. gender. ethnicity and social status, which was not robust to further adjustments. There was. however, an association between combined intake of tea and coffee (two or more cups per clay of both beverage) and diabetes (HR 0.68: 95% CI 0.46, 0.99: P<0.05) after full adjustment. In conclusion, relatively moderate intake (more than three CLIPS per (lay) of coffee and tea were not prospectively associated with incidence of type 2 diabetes although there was evidence of a combined effect. The limited range of exposure and beverage consumption according to socio-economic class may explain these conflicting findings.

Type: Article
Title: Prospective study of coffee and tea consumption in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus among men and women: The Whitehall II study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0007114508944135
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114508944135
Language: English
Additional information: © The Authors 2008
Keywords: Coffee, Tea, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Diet, Antioxidants, RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN, DIETARY FLAVONOIDS, INSULIN-RESISTANCE, GLUCOSE-TOLERANCE, BLOOD-GLUCOSE, CAFFEINE, HEALTH, ANTIOXIDANTS
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/85305
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