UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Does amblyopia affect educational, health, and social outcomes? Findings from 1958 British birth cohort

Rahi, JS; Cumberland, PM; Peckham, CS; (2006) Does amblyopia affect educational, health, and social outcomes? Findings from 1958 British birth cohort. BRIT MED J , 332 (7545) 820 - 824. 10.1136/bmj.38751.597963.AE. Green open access

[img]
Preview
PDF
8158.pdf

Download (270kB)

Abstract

Objective To determine the association of amblyopia with diverse educational, health, and social outcomes in order to inform current debate about population screening for this condition.Design, setting, and participants Comparison of 8432 people with normal vision in each eye with 429 (4.8%) people with amblyopia (childhood Unilateral reduced acuity when tested with correction and unaccounted for by eye disease) from the 1958 British birth cohort, with respect to subsequent health and social functioning.Results No functionally or clinically significant differences between people with and without amblyopia in education outcomes, behavioural difficulties or social maladjustment, participation in social activities, Unintended injuries (school, workplace, or road traffic accidents as driver), general or mental health and mortality, paid employment, or occupation based social class trajectories.Conclusions It may be difficult to distinguish, at population level, between the lives of people with amblyopia and those without, in terms of several important outcomes. A pressing need exists for further concerted research on what it means to have amblyopia and, specifically, how this varies with severity and how it changes with treatment, so that screening programmes can best serve those who have the most to gain from early identification.

Type: Article
Title: Does amblyopia affect educational, health, and social outcomes? Findings from 1958 British birth cohort
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmj.38751.597963.AE
Publisher version: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ articles/PMC14321...
Keywords: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL, VISUAL IMPAIRMENT, FOLLOW-UP, VISION, CHILDREN, POPULATION, RISK
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Genetics and Genomic Medicine Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/8158
Downloads since deposit
392Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item